World Drone Organization™ https://worlddroneorganization.com Your link to the drone world Sun, 11 Aug 2019 21:56:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.3 https://worlddroneorganization.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/cropped-Drone_logo1-32x32.png World Drone Organization™ https://worlddroneorganization.com 32 32 7 Common Questions About Drones in Agriculture- From Drone Life https://worlddroneorganization.com/7-common-questions-about-drones-in-agriculture-from-drone-life/ Sun, 11 Aug 2019 21:22:16 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=833 We put together this post to consolidate useful tips and information in one place and address these frequently asked questions: How high should I fly and what overlap should I use? How can I map larger areas and fly offline with DroneDeploy? How do I view plant health data? Do I need a special camera?[...]

The post 7 Common Questions About Drones in Agriculture- From Drone Life appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>

We put together this post to consolidate useful tips and information in one place and address these frequently asked questions:

  1. How high should I fly and what overlap should I use?
  2. How can I map larger areas and fly offline with DroneDeploy?
  3. How do I view plant health data? Do I need a special camera?
  4. What’s new that I should know about?
  5. How can I export my data to compare it to yield maps, soil maps and other data?
  6. Where can I go to learn more or get help?
  7. What plan should I buy?

1. How high should I fly and what overlap should I use?

There isn’t a formula that will tell you exactly how high to fly and how much overlap to use. That said, having an understanding of how flight altitude and overlap contribute to your map quality can help you choose better settings, and there are a few general guidelines that you can use.

First, let’s talk about flight altitude. At the most basic level, flying higher allows you to cover more ground in a shorter amount of time with less battery usage. Since many fields are quite large, many drone operators in ag fly as high as they can. In the U.S., that means just under 400 ft, the maximum height permitted by the FAA.

The downside to flying high is that the imagery captured is lower resolution than if you flew lower. That’s why how high you should fly depends on how you want to use the map. If you are crop-scouting a relatively mature crop and simply looking for areas of variability, you probably don’t need very high resolution imagery. However, if you’re looking at emergence of young plants, you may need to fly lower (150–200 feet) to be able to make out the plants against the soil in your completed map.

Overlap refers to the amount of overlap between the photos that the drone captures. When DroneDeploy processes a map, our software looks for features that appear across multiple photos, and uses the recognition of those features to stitch the images together into a map. In general, the higher the overlap, the easier it is for the software to identify features across multiple photos, and the higher the likelihood that it will generate a successful, high quality map.

As you might have guessed, there’s a trade-off. The higher the overlap, the closer together the legs of the drone’s flight paths will be, the longer the flight will take, the more battery the drone will consume, and the more images the drone will capture to cover the same area.

2. How can I map larger areas and fly offline with DroneDeploy?

It’s not uncommon for DroneDeploy users in agriculture to want to map large fields, many of which are in areas with poor wifi and cell service. Fortunately, you can mitigate both of these potential issues by planning ahead.

Plan your flights on your computer. If you’re concerned about connectivity issues, it’s a great idea to make your flight plans ahead of time, when you’re back at your computer. Then, while you still have connectivity, open the DroneDeploy app on your mobile device to sync the plans. After the plans sync, you can go out to the field and fly — no cell or wifi connection required.

Bring extra batteries. If you’re mapping large areas (over 100 acres), the batteries are the limiting factor in how much ground you can cover. Fortunately, when your battery runs low, it’s very easy to bring the drone back, swap in a new battery, and keep mapping. If you’re in the middle of a mission and you see the battery get low, just click the “Home” button to bring the drone home. Then swap in the new battery and re-open the plan you were flying. The plan should automatically know where to restart the mission, but even if it doesn’t, you can manually select the restart point.

Pro tip: To maximize battery efficiency when mapping large areas, click the “Home” button when the drone is closest to you in its path — that will minimize the amount of time and battery life spent flying back and forth for the swap.

Interested in learning more about how to charge and maintain your batteries? Check out some of these resources:

3. How do I view plant health data? Do I need a special camera?

Example of an NDVI map

If you’re reading this post, odds are you’ve seen one of these red and green maps and heard the term NDVI — but you still might have a lot of questions about how to use it.

Let’s start with the basics. Healthy plants reflect a lot of near infrared (NIR) and green light and absorb a lot of red light. Vegetation indices interpret the amount of light captured across different wavelengths in order to increase the contrast in your map and highlight variability in a way that corresponds to plant health or stress. Different vegetation indices were developed with different purposes and for different camera or sensor types. NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, Rouse et al., 1973) is one of the oldest and most well-known indices, and it’s intended to be used with NIR imagery.

What this means is that if you want to use the NDVI index for true NDVI, you need a NIR camera. However, if you don’t have a NIR camera, you can still use a vegetation index to highlight variability. In fact, one of the indices you’ll find in DroneDeploy, the VARI index (Visible Atmospherically Resistant Index, Gitelson et al., 2002), is intended explicitly for use with visible spectrum (Red Green Blue or RGB) imagery.

Read how Brent used the VARI index to locate rust fungus in his field

One of our recent case studies shows how a first time mapper used the RGB camera on his Phantom 4 with the VARI index to assess wind damage and detect rust fungus.

It’s important to note that not all NIR cameras are the same. When applying the NDVI index in DroneDeploy, you will need to select the type of filter you used to capture the imagery in the “Band Order” dropdown. Not sure what filter to select on your map? Check out our guide that lists the filter types for many common cameras.

Want to learn more? Check out these resources:

4. What’s new that I should know about?

Zone Management

Your Plant Health map will show a high degree of detail, but sometimes it’s helpful to aggregate the data in your map into similar regions by applying zones or a grid. Not only can this help you visually detect health differences between larger areas, it also makes the dataset more manageable to use outside of DroneDeploy, either for analyzing in other software or for inputting to precision ag equipment. Learn more about management zones.

Plant Count and Stand Count Tools

Estimating plant counts using conventional methods is a time-consuming, manual process, and since only sample areas are counted, it doesn’t give you a complete view of your plant or stand count. Now DroneDeploy customers can use two new third-party tools available from within the DroneDeploy dashboard to automate the process and provide more complete, accurate data. The tool from Aglytix is intended for analyzing stand count in emergent corn and soy, whereas the tool from AgriSens specializes in counting visibly distinct plant like trees in an orchard or tomato plantings in a field. Learn more about these new plant count tools.

This is just a small portion of a map with over 400,000 tomato plants.

Curious about how growers are using these tools? Check out this recent case study about how one grower used the plant count tool to count over 400,000 tomato plants and show that losses after transplanting by a third party were higher than reported so that the planter could be held accountable.

5. How can I export my map to compare it to yield maps, soil maps and other data?

A drone map can help you tell that an area of your crop is stressed, but to understand why it’s stressed or what that means for your yield, you need more information. Ground-truthing is one important way to get it, but you can also combine your drone map with other data sets, like your soil sample data or last year’s yield map to get deeper insights.

Read more about how a team of experts compared plant health and soil sample data.

For example, in a recent case study, a team of experts explored the relationship between soil sample data and a drone health map and found surprising correlations.

To export a map, first go to the layer of the map that you want to export (orthomosaic, plant health, elevation, etc.) and then click the “Export” button. From there, you can customize the export depending on your needs. Possible options include exporting raster (GeoTiff) or vector (shapefile) data, projecting in a local EPSG coordinate system, and choosing a level of resolution. If you plan to use the imagery in specific precision ag software, we also provide guidelines to help make sure you export in the right format.

Want to learn more? Check out these resources:

6. Where can I go to learn more or get help?

During the growing season, customers on our special ag plan (see below for more information) can take advantage of a 2 hour training session with experts on using drones in agriculture from AgFlyers and reach out to our support team by email or live chat from 8 am to 7 pm CDT to get help with specific issues and questions.

Looking explore on your own? Here are some additional resources to get you started:

  • Help Center. Check out our detailed step-by-step guides on how to use DroneDeploy, including this guide for agriculture.
  • Forum. Visit our active forum to stay up to date on recent developments and get advice from our community.
  • YouTube Channel. Check out the DroneDeploy channel to see our latest how-to videos.

7. What plan should I buy?

Before you buy a plan, try DroneDeploy for yourself! Sign up today to start your free 30-day trial of the Pro plan today. If you need to map larger areas or export data for use in farm software, the DroneDeploy Business Plan might better fit your needs. Check out our pricing page to learn more about our different options. Not sure which plan is best for you? Just reach out to us at sales@dronedeploy.com and one of our representatives would be happy to help you find the right plan.

Frank Schroth is editor in chief of DroneLife, the authoritative source for news and analysis on the drone industry: it’s people, products, trends, and events.
Email Frank
TWITTER:@fschroth

The post 7 Common Questions About Drones in Agriculture- From Drone Life appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
NEW EVENT: GATEWAY DRONE RODEO & RC EXPO GREENSBORO, NC JUNE 1, 2019 https://worlddroneorganization.com/new-event-gateway-drone-rodeo-rc-expo-greensboro-nc-june-1-2019/ Wed, 24 Apr 2019 15:50:39 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=828 Greensboro, NC will hold its first Drone Rodeo and RC Expo at Gateway Gardens off Lee St. Admission is Free and all are welcomed for food, music and the drone world experience. We hope to see you there from 1:00PM to 6:00PM on June 1st.Drone Rodeo Flyer[1316]

The post NEW EVENT: GATEWAY DRONE RODEO & RC EXPO GREENSBORO, NC JUNE 1, 2019 appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
Greensboro, NC will hold its first Drone Rodeo and RC Expo at Gateway Gardens off Lee St. Admission is Free and all are welcomed for food, music and the drone world experience. We hope to see you there from 1:00PM to 6:00PM on June 1st.Drone Rodeo Flyer[1316]

The post NEW EVENT: GATEWAY DRONE RODEO & RC EXPO GREENSBORO, NC JUNE 1, 2019 appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
This drone helped a SWAT team defuse an armed standoff https://worlddroneorganization.com/this-drone-helped-a-swat-team-defuse-an-armed-standoff/ Thu, 28 Feb 2019 01:46:25 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=822 Last year, Impossible Aerospace built a drone that’s literally filled with batteries, so it can fly for up to two hours on a charge. Now, the company says a 90-minute version of its US-1 quadcopter has proven its worth to a SWAT team in Campbell, California. On February 8th, a Denny’s restaurant in Campbell was the[...]

The post This drone helped a SWAT team defuse an armed standoff appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
Last year, Impossible Aerospace built a drone that’s literally filled with batteries, so it can fly for up to two hours on a charge. Now, the company says a 90-minute version of its US-1 quadcopter has proven its worth to a SWAT team in Campbell, California.

On February 8th, a Denny’s restaurant in Campbell was the site of a nearly 12-hour armed standoff, where a man started his 5AM day with a cup of coffee, but later pulled a gun on a Denny’s employee, according to an earlier report from the San Jose Mercury News. Apparently, the Silicon Valley cops had plenty of toys to help with the situation — police reportedly sent a bomb-sniffing robot inside the building to take pictures of the suspect, as well as using an “audible diversionary device.”

But it was the Impossible Aerospace drone that got an enviable vantage point above the building, where it flew for 45 minutes, using its thermal sensors and standard cameras to monitor the building’s perimeter and assist in the actual arrest.

The company says that though the SWAT team used tear gas canisters to flush the suspect out, the drone’s live video feed let law enforcement see that the gas was leaking out of a kitchen vent rather than getting him to leave. So they added more tear gas, and that apparently did the trick.

The post This drone helped a SWAT team defuse an armed standoff appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
Drone Racers Sports Club Association https://worlddroneorganization.com/drone-racers-sports-club-association/ Thu, 28 Feb 2019 01:34:47 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=818 Drone Racers Sports Club Association (DYD) was established in March 2017 with the aim of growing and disciplining the sport, developing  respect and representing Turkey in professional competitions organized domestically and abroad by training professional pilots. The Club also takes part in “Turkish Aerial Sports Federation” which is a goverment organization, formed also in 2017.[...]

The post Drone Racers Sports Club Association appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
Drone Racers Sports Club Association (DYD) was established in March 2017 with the aim of growing and disciplining the sport, developing  respect and representing Turkey in professional competitions organized domestically and abroad by training professional pilots. The Club also takes part in “Turkish Aerial Sports Federation” which is a goverment organization, formed also in 2017.

 

The Club organized “Turkey Drone Championship” with the support of The Federation in 2017 and took a big step in promoting UAV Races as a sport in Turkey. We are pleased to see the increase in the number of clubs and drone racing championships in Turkey in 2018. Our club is the first and has the biggest number of competing pilots in Turkey at the moment and with the support of our sponsors, we are proud to announce that, the “World Drone Cup” organization will be held on 20-23 September 2018, at the New  Istanbul Airport , within “The Techno Fest”

The post Drone Racers Sports Club Association appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
FAA Issues Request for Information (RFI) from Industry Partners Interested in Developing Remote ID and Unmanned Traffic Management (UTM) Systems https://worlddroneorganization.com/faa-issues-request-for-information-rfi-from-industry-partners-interested-in-developing-remote-id-and-unmanned-traffic-management-utm-systems/ Sun, 27 Jan 2019 16:21:58 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=813 Remote identification is an essential component of developing an unmanned aircraft traffic management system (UTM). A UTM implemented across the national air space (NAS) would allow drones to operate beyond visual line-of-sight safely, without posing risk to other unmanned and manned aircraft. In order to track the status of drones and provide that information to[...]

The post FAA Issues Request for Information (RFI) from Industry Partners Interested in Developing Remote ID and Unmanned Traffic Management (UTM) Systems appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
Remote identification is an essential component of developing an unmanned aircraft traffic management system (UTM). A UTM implemented across the national air space (NAS) would allow drones to operate beyond visual line-of-sight safely, without posing risk to other unmanned and manned aircraft. In order to track the status of drones and provide that information to UTM managers, the FAA must find a way to remotely identify drones and the persons flying them.

The FAA, NASA, and industry partners have established a research team to map out the development of a UTM. To further their research, and to begin developing and testing actual systems, the FAA has also announced a Remote ID Request for Information (RFI).

FAA ISSUES A REMOTE ID REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI)

The FAA is actively pursuing solutions for a system that can gather and share data needed to remotely identify small unmanned aircraft (sUAS) flying in the NAS.

In this pursuit, the FAA is looking to industry partners for help. On December 20, 2018, the FAA issued a Remote Identification RFI.

The purpose of the RFI is twofold:

  • Engage with industry partners interested in becoming Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Service Suppliers (USS) with the intent of furthering remote ID technology
  • Develop and demonstrate data sharing techniques for remote ID in the NAS

The RFI will help the FAA select a small group of industry partners to develop a technical and legal framework for initial prototyping and testing of a remote ID system. While the FAA is only looking to recruit a small group of eight USS, they intend to open the program for broader participation in the future.

REMOTE ID DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING HAS ALREADY BEGUN IN THE PRIVATE AND COMMERCIAL SECTOR

Some companies have already come together to show what a functional remote ID system could look like. While there is competition among individual stakeholders in remote ID, they’ve also demonstrated a valuable willingness to collaborate.

Amazon, Boeing, GE, and Google

At the 2018 FAA Symposium, Amazon, Boeing, GE, and Google announced that they are working on a private UTM system. The proposed system will allow drones to fly a couple of hundred feet above the ground and function on a network of cellular and web applications.

Amazon, Boeing, GE, and Google have expressed their interest in using drones to deliver goods, and are therefore stakeholders in remote ID and UTM development. These systems will need to be developed and put into place before these companies can offer routine drone deliveries to their customers in the U.S.

The post FAA Issues Request for Information (RFI) from Industry Partners Interested in Developing Remote ID and Unmanned Traffic Management (UTM) Systems appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
The International Drone Conference & Exhibition 2019 Las Vegas, NV https://worlddroneorganization.com/the-international-drone-conference-exhibition-2019-las-vegas-nv/ Mon, 31 Dec 2018 21:10:20 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=795 InterDrone 2019 The International Drone Conference & Exhibition Date: 9/3/2019 – 9/6/2019 Venue: Rio All-Suite Las Vegas, Las Vegas NV, United States InterDrone will be the largest event in North America dedicated to the commercial drone market. Featuring technical conferences for builders, buyers and flyers of commercial drones, InterDrone will bring the entire industry together[...]

The post The International Drone Conference & Exhibition 2019 Las Vegas, NV appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
InterDrone 2019

InterDrone 2019

The International Drone Conference & Exhibition
Date: 9/3/2019 – 9/6/2019
Venue: Rio All-Suite Las Vegas, Las Vegas NV, United States
InterDrone will be the largest event in North America dedicated to the commercial drone market. Featuring technical conferences for builders, buyers and flyers of commercial drones, InterDrone will bring the entire industry together in one place.

Website: http://www.interdrone.com/

The post The International Drone Conference & Exhibition 2019 Las Vegas, NV appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
FAA: Drone Manufacturers Must Regulate Themselves https://worlddroneorganization.com/faa-drone-manufacturers-must-regulate-themselves/ Mon, 31 Dec 2018 21:05:14 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=792 FAA: Drone Manufacturers Must Regulate Themselves Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick published an article on jdsupra.com discussing how the FAA is forcing drone manufactures to self-regulate. In October of 2018, the Federal Aviation Authority Reauthorization 2018 Act was signed into law. The new law comes with a set of regulations which for the first time extend[...]

The post FAA: Drone Manufacturers Must Regulate Themselves appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
FAA: Drone Manufacturers Must Regulate Themselves
Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick published an article on jdsupra.com discussing how the FAA is forcing drone manufactures to self-regulate.

In October of 2018, the Federal Aviation Authority Reauthorization 2018 Act was signed into law. The new law comes with a set of regulations which for the first time extend the FAA’s authority over the manufacturers of drones. For convenience’s sake, in this article I will use the term “drone” to describe what the FAA calls a small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS). Before the 2018 Act was signed into law, the only regulations concerning drones were limited to the pilots and their operations of drones. Now, manufacturers are tasked with knowing and understanding the FAA Rules to lawfully make and sell drones in the United States.

Manufacturers might wonder why they are suddenly the target of FAA authority. Recently, the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 formally integrated drones and other small unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace system. Drone pilots who wanted to use a drone for commercial purpose were required to learn the regulation and pass a certification exam to earn a drone pilot license. As a licensed pilot, I can confirm that the test is thorough and imparts a meaningful understanding of the safe operation of an aircraft within the national airspace system. However, under those 2012 changes, drone pilots whether professional or hobbyist still bore sole responsibility for safe operation of their aircraft.

Airbus Monitors and Separates Drone Traffic

Since 2012, drones have quickly become a serious threat to the safe operation of the national airspace system. First, drones have become so simple to use that anyone could buy a drone off the shelf of nearly any major electronics store and fly it within a few minutes and without any training. Second, drones have become so advanced and so powerful that they are capable of flying greater distances from the operator while maintaining complete control. Further, the development and improvements of wireless camera technology — which lets the drone pilot see a real-time feed through a camera mounted on the drone — is a likely culprit for why drones have seen such a recent surge in hobbyist and use. A hobbyist can legally buy and fly a drone without any clue about the complex rules that govern the airspace system, which has created an unjustifiable risk of misuse, accidents, and possibly even death.

The FAA’s rule is intended to impose safety standards on manufacturers. The formal mission of the FAA is to provide the safest, most efficient airspace system in the world. Prior regulations were considered insufficient to preserve the safe operation of the national airspace system in light of advances in drone technology. Because of these advances, the FAA is no longer comfortable leaving the responsibility of safe operation solely within the hands of drone pilots. While drone pilots will also fall under increased scrutiny in the 2018 Act, drone manufacturers are now responsible for implementing safety standards that will force compliance by drone pilots.

Section 345
The obligations on drone manufacturers are set forth in Section 345 of the 2018 Act, and compliance is mandatory. The FAA Administrator will set a process for authorizing manufacturers to self-certify that the drones they produce comply with the relevant safety standards. To introduce a drone into interstate commerce, the drone must be either self-certified by the manufacturer or approved by the FAA Administrator.

The post FAA: Drone Manufacturers Must Regulate Themselves appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
Applications for Real Estate Drones https://worlddroneorganization.com/applications-for-real-estate-drones/ Wed, 18 Jul 2018 19:06:57 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=755 Have you ever wondered where the aerial view photos of your favorite listed houses come from?  It’s not from a helicopter or a bird with a camera attached to it.  Most of the time these photos actually come from a drone, like the ones that you use for everyday recreational purposes. Drones can be used for[...]

The post Applications for Real Estate Drones appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>

Have you ever wondered where the aerial view photos of your favorite listed houses come from?  It’s not from a helicopter or a bird with a camera attached to it.  Most of the time these photos actually come from a drone, like the ones that you use for everyday recreational purposes. Drones can be used for taking photos of residential real estate and commercial real estate as well as help with real estate marketing.

 

Reasons for Real Estate Drones

Real estate agents have been using drones for taking aerial views to up their marketing game and impress buyers.  To a real estate agent drones are the new best methods for getting their houses sold.  The more flattering angles of the house they can show the better. Basically, drone photos are a method give their property listing an advantage over the other property listings.

 

Importance for Using Drones for Real Estate Marketing

Is it important for realtors to use drones for selling real estate? Competition is a big part of selling real estate.  If all the houses on a block were listed the same but one was listed with an aerial view of the whole property, based on visuals which listing would have the advantage??  For real estate agents, there is always a need to market better than their competitors. Drone photos and videos can give them an edge.

 

Residential Real Estate Drone Usage

Real estate agents not only use the drones for aerial view photography, they also use them for house walkthroughs and showing the surrounding area of a home in relation to significant landmarks.  For example, if you are thinking about buying a house near the city, wouldn’t you want to know where your lot sits compared to other lots and houses in the neighborhood or the proximity of lakes or streams?

 

Commercial Real Estate Drone Usage

Drones could also be used for commercial property listings.  If you wanted to buy an office space in a city wouldn’t you want to know where it is in relation to other buildings and or landmarks of that city?  For example, how close is your building going to be in relation to surrounding parking decks. You don’t want your customers to walk miles to get to your business.  Drones would be a great way to show business owners the properties they want to buy.

 

Drones for Real Estate Marketing

Drones are a great tool for real estate marketing in that they can make a property listing look more appealing because of the perspective that a home buyer is looking at.  They also give more ways of looking at a property that no one has ever thought of before.

 

However, this is not the only application for drone usage that people have come up with.  You never know what might happen to this world.  Maybe one day drones will be used to pollinate the Earth or help with building construction.  Stay tuned for more ways on how drones could be used in future posts.

 

World Drone Organization is now looking for commercial drone operators to advertise and/or have their service rated on this site.

The post Applications for Real Estate Drones appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
Be Compliant, Drone Fines Are On The Rise! https://worlddroneorganization.com/be-compliant-drone-fines-are-on-the-rise/ Sat, 05 May 2018 20:17:46 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=537 Looking at the increase in the number of drone fines charged against illegal behavior by aviation authorities over the world, I see an emerging trend: more and more authorities are starting to prosecute unlawful drone operations. While this is good news, many in the industry – as well as myself – feel that the authorities have been slow[...]

The post Be Compliant, Drone Fines Are On The Rise! appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>

Looking at the increase in the number of drone fines charged against illegal behavior by aviation authorities over the world, I see an emerging trend: more and more authorities are starting to prosecute unlawful drone operations.


While this is good news, many in the industry – as well as myself – feel that the authorities have been slow in enforcing. Why is that?

Well, most of the focus of the regulators to date has been on defining the legal framework of this new industry. How can you enforce if you don’t have a clear set of rules in place first?

Drones represent a revolutionary technology which is booming and being adopted across several verticals with new uses discovered almost every day. While the technology is ready and progresses at an amazing pace, regulators are chasing rather than anticipating this changing industry 

The problem was (and still is), setting the rules isn’t an easy task.

Even in countries where considerable efforts have been made so far in building a legal framework for safely integrating drones into airspace, regulators had to conciliate two different interests – sometimes conflicting: promoting safety and compliance and supporting the needs of the fast-growing drone industry.

Another factor complicating the regulatory efforts is that increased drone use raises several issuesfrom a legal perspective.

Operating a drone involves different areas of law: privacy law, tort law, insurance law, civil aviation regulations, in particular, safety for people and manned aircraft.  On top of that, privacy is a trending topic in the past few months. 

The complexity of this task increases in countries where multiple authorities have input and control over some of the legal aspects related to hobbyist and commercial flying.

For example, in the U.S., a confusing crossover of federal, state and local regulations – the so-called patchwork quilt – is negatively impacting the industry’s development and the capacity of the authorities to focus on enforcement, as a recent research by the Center for the Study of the Drone atBard College highlights. One of their key insights was that in several cases local drone laws contravene the FAA’s drone rules, resulting in legal conflicts.

Crossing the ocean, while the European Commission has started to draft a blueprint of a legal framework for operating drones, individual  EU member states still have the total decision-making power over drone regulations and legal prosecutions. While the Commission has put a lot of effort recently to standardize drone rules, analysts expect areas of conflict between the European framework and the state and local laws to emerge.

Another problem the aviation authorities have been struggling to deal with is the lack of resources specifically dedicated to managing drone registrations, complaints and reports of illegal or reckless operations.

Despite these difficulties, during the last couple of years, several countries managed to put a drone regulatory framework in place, and are switching their attention from setting the rules to enforcing them.

Moreover, drone regulation is not the concern of drone operators only. Their clients are requiring compliance as well to protect their own brands.

Content buyers have begun to understand that drone content must be acquired legally – like any other type of content such as music – if they don’t want to face the risks associated with illegal operations.

In some countries, regulators are enforcing on the buyers’ side too. For example, in the US, if you hire a drone operator who doesn’t hold a Part 107 allowing commercial operations, you could be facing federal charges as well.

If you are curious to read about some of the most significant cases involving prosecution for non-compliance, I compiled a list of 15 interesting drone fines from around the world, showing the increasing prosecution trend.

So whether you’re a drone operator looking to monetize your drone in a compliant way or whether you’re an aerial content buyer looking for legally acquired content, the website, droneregulations.info,  provides a straightforward overview of regulation by country. UAV Coach also offers an updated list of drone laws and regulations by country, making it impossible to feign ignorance of the rules.

The post Be Compliant, Drone Fines Are On The Rise! appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
Drone Pilot Ground School Launches STEM Scholarship for High School Students https://worlddroneorganization.com/drone-pilot-ground-school-launches-stem-scholarship-for-high-school-students/ Mon, 09 Apr 2018 20:19:39 +0000 https://worlddroneorganization.com/?p=539 Drone Pilot Ground School Launches STEM Scholarship for High School Students Drone Pilot Ground School recently launched a scholarship to support U.S. high school students who want to become certified commercial drone pilots. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics or STEM, is a curriculum, based on the idea of educating students in four specific disciplines in an often ‘hands-on’ approach.[...]

The post Drone Pilot Ground School Launches STEM Scholarship for High School Students appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>
Drone Pilot Ground School Launches STEM Scholarship for High School Students

Drone Pilot Ground School recently launched a scholarship to support U.S. high school students who want to become certified commercial drone pilots.


Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics or STEM, is a curriculum, based on the idea of educating students in four specific disciplines in an often ‘hands-on’ approach.

The High School STEM Scholarship for Aspiring Commercial Drone Pilots provides free access to Drone Pilot Ground School, a leading remote test prep course for the FAA’s Part 107 exam, and will also pay for Part 107 test fees (up to $150) for the first 100 students to take the test.

The idea for the scholarship first came from Alan Perlman, CEO and founder of Drone Pilot Ground Schooland Matt Ernst, founder of the Taft Drone Club at the Robert A.Taft Information Technology High School in Cincinnati, Ohio.

The Taft Drone Club uses drones for education, and has recently received a grant for $100,000 from the state of Ohio to support his efforts in STEM education using drones.

This new, first of its kind scholarship for high school students aims at supporting young people trying to break into the drone industry while also helping spread the use of drones in STEM education.

“We know the drone industry has the potential for creating new jobs for young people, and can help students get excited about STEM subjects. Providing a scholarship to interested, qualified high school students just seemed like a natural outgrowth of the support we’ve given the students at Taft High.”

said Perlman.

One of the primary motivators for Matt Ernst forming his club was to offer his students opportunities for making a good living. As drones get cheaper – with plenty of mini-drones under $100 to try out and learn on, and prosumer models selling for under $5,000 – and as drone applications proliferate, the potential for high school students to create a foundation for future careers in the drone industry seems strong to him.

More and more, drones are being used to help students learn – and get excited about – STEM subjects in middle, high, and even elementary school

Across the U.S. drones have become a part of robotics classes, coding classes, and even lessons on longitude and latitude. New platforms like DroneBlocks actually provide curricula materials for educators who want to use drones in the classroom, and drone manufacturers like Parrot have launched specialized educational programmes based on drones.

The drone industry itself is growing, and there promises to be new jobs on the horizon for drone pilots who hold a remote pilot license, from aerial cinematography to work in agriculture, forestry, mapping, and much more (even if a recent survey by Skylogic Research debunked the media hype about drones, showing for example that 75% of aerial business providers in the U.S. perform one to five projects only per month).

About the Scholarship

The High School STEM Scholarship for Aspiring Commercial Drone Pilots was launched to support high school students ages 16 and up who are serious about becoming certified drone pilots by helping them prepare for the FAA’s Part 107 test.

An additional goal is to help further the use of drones in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education.

The post Drone Pilot Ground School Launches STEM Scholarship for High School Students appeared first on World Drone Organization™.

]]>